Summer Media Institute Recruits High School Students Interested in Journalism and Communications

Background Info: This press release was written based off a live lecture were Professor Lowe came and talked about the Summer Media Institute. Professor Lowe will be picking a few press releases to be used by the SMI.

Office of News and Communications

April 16, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

     (GAINESVILLE, Florida) – The University of Florida Summer Media Institute is a five-night, six-day workshop where high school students are immersed in journalism and communications. This year’s SMI will be held from June 24 to 29. 

     Students attending will be able to take part in an assortment of electives and specializations as well as learn from UF instructors and industry leaders. Students will have hands-on opportunities at one of the largest and most comprehensive journalism and communications programs in the nation. 

     Students will be able to preview college by living in and dining in a UF residence hall and touring the campus. Participants will also engage with college admission and financial aid experts.

     Those attending the conference will get to hear from four keynote speakers. Slated to speak so far are Eric Deganns, a music critic for NPR and Mira Lowe, the director of the Innovation News Center. 

     Students will also get to hear from Professor Frank LoMonte who will be discussing first amendment issues. The students will learn how to do investigative journalism and how to use the rules in their favor when principals say they can’t have access to information.

     Students will get to choose an elective to go to each morning and learn about print, online and broadcast disciplines. Elective choices include color creations, sports reporting, entertainment reporting, podcasting, weather reporting and a few others. 

     Students will also choose a specialization where they will spend 16 hours over four days with a smaller group and broaden their skills in an area they choose. Some specialization students can choose from are sports reporting, filmmaking, modern magazine production, anchoring, photojournalism and a few others.

     All high school students should think about participating in this program if they are interested in the journalism and communications field. Students participating may not get into UF in the future, but this program will help prepare students for college and a future career in the field. 

     “You’re going to go to college somewhere, if it’s UF great if it’s not UF you’re still going to be better prepared having attended this conference than if you had not,” Hebert Lowe Director of SMI said.

     The mission of SMI is to begin preparing high school students for careers in the rapidly changing media environment through a week-long workshop. 

     The cost of SMI is $795 and registration ends on May 31. 

     For more information and how to register visit www.jou.ufl.edu/summermediainstitute. Questions about the program can be answered by Professor Herbert Lowe at (352) 294-1399.

     Follow SMI on Twitter @ufcjcsmiand on Instagram @ufcjcsmito learn more about the program and get the latest updates. 

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St. Pete And Clearwater Beach Make TripAdvisor’s List Of Top Beaches

Background Info: This press release was written from a fact sheet given to us by our lab instructor.

Office of News and Communications

April 9, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

     (ST. PETE/CLEARWATER, Florida) – Neighboring St. Petersburg is St. Pete Beach, which was honored as the fourth best beach spot in the U.S., according to TripAdvisor’s list of Top Beaches for 2016. Not too far from St. Pete Beach is Clearwater beach, which was ranked the best beach spot in the U.S.

     Both beaches were also featured in Travel + Leisure’s top five summer trip ideas, making the beaches a perfect vacation destination for families or those looking for a more vibrant young people scene. 

     St. Pete Beach has been described as a postcard-perfect beach destination because of its sugar-white sands and blue waters. It offers as much relaxation or adventure as a vacationer could want.  

     Vacationers can learn more about the Old Florida vibe at other beaches along the coast like Treasure Island and Pass-A-Grille. Beaches like Honeymoon Island and Caladesi Island are great getaway destinations because they are undeveloped beaches. 

     People wishing to vacation here can camp on or close to St. Pete Beach for those looking for something out-of-the-ordinary. Those looking for a traditional stay can check out the hotels lining both St. Pete and Clearwater beach.  

     “In 2017, we had four hotels open, which offer more opportunities to welcome visitors to our community,” David Downing, the Visit St. Pete/Clearwater Executive Director, said.

     St. Petersburg is located on a peninsula that sits between Florida’s Gulf Coast and Tampa Bay. Its nickname is the “Sunshine City” because its average of 361 days of sunshine and pleasant weather, which makes it a year-round destination for golfing, boating, fishing and beach going.

     In recent years St. Petersburg has attracted a youthful demographic as it expands its vibrant arts scene, catered to a more foodie-focused audience and revitalized its bayfront with high-rise apartments, new shops and festivals. St. Pete Beach is also a short drive away from downtown.

      “We are proud that St. Pete/Clearwater is a top destination for both visitors and locals,”  Downing said. “It speaks to the work we have been doing to create a vibrant community that is constantly evolving.” 

     The Visit St. Pete/Clearwater mission is to enhance the county's economy by increasing direct visitor expenditures and job development, training and retention in the tourism industry.

     For more information about the beaches in the St. Pete/Clearwater area check out their website: https://www.visitstpeteclearwater.com/things-to-do/beaches

     Follow Visit St. Pete/Clearwater on Twitter @VSPC and “Like” the Facebook page at facebook.com/VisitStPeteClearwater.

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Disney Animal Kingdom Hours To Be Extended

Background Info: This press release was written from a fact sheet given to us by our lab instructor.

Office of News and Communications

April 2, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Disney Animal Kingdom Hours To Be Extended

     (ORLANDO, Florida) --- Walt Disney’s Animal Kingdom will now be closing at 10 p.m. starting April 22. 

     The new hours will kick off with a ribbon cutting ceremony starting at 6 p.m. in front of the “Tree of Life.” Those in attendance will be Bob Weis, the President of Walt Disney Imagineering, Jon Favreau, Director of the live-action movie of the Jungle Book, Djuan Rivers, and Vice President of Disney’s Animal Kingdom at Walt Disney World Resorts, in addition to the cast of “The Jungle Book: Alive with Magic.”

     When the park originally opened, its hours were 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. – the shortest of the Disney World parks. With new hours well after nightfall, the park will be introducing several new experiences.

     The new attractions will include The Tree of Life Awakens, Kilimanjaro Safaris after Dark and the Jungle Book: Alive with Magic. Most Animal Kingdom attractions will remain open at nightfall and provide a new experience for park-goers.

     Throughout the evening, nature scenes featuring animals, such as raccoons, gorillas and birds, will be projected onto the carved bark of the “Tree of Life” and backed by music.

     Guest will be able to experience Kilimanjaro Safaris in a new light with a specially lighted screen. During the expedition, guests will get to see the nighttime behaviors of the animals in addition to two new members of the Animal Kingdom, the African Wild Dog and Hyenas. 

     The Jungle Book: Alive with Magic show is based on the live-action movie where the audience will go on a journey through the jungle with Mowgli. The show will feature live singing, dance performances, projections onto water curtains, floating stages and fire-spinning routines. 

     “We’re so thrilled at how much ‘The Jungle Book’ film has been embraced by audiences around the world,” Michael Jung Creative Director at Walt Disney Imagineering Creative Entertainment, said. “And we couldn’t be more excited to celebrate ‘The Jungle Book’ with this new live show. 

     The Walt Disney Company's mission is to be one of the world's leading producers and providers of entertainment and information, using its portfolio of brands to differentiate its content, services and consumer products.

     For more information check out the website: https://disneyworld.disney.go.com/destinations/animal-kingdom/

     Follow Disney on Twitter @WaltDisneyWorld and “Like” the Facebook page at facebook.com/WaltDisneyWorld. For live updates on Twitter during the ribbon cutting, search for #AKafterdark.

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News Writing

Background Info: This package was written from an old news story given to us by our lab instructor.

PACKAGE

[TALENT INTRO]

A U-F STUDENT WHO DONATED HIS BONE MARROW MET THE MAN WHO RECEIVED THE MARROW AT AN X AMBASSADORS CONCERT EARLIER TODAY.

[TAKE VO]

UF STUDENT MY-KULL SIZE-ICK JOINED THE BONE MARROW REGISTRY ABOUT A YEAR AGO WHEN HE HAD HIS CHEEK SWABBED OUTSIDE OF LIBRARY WEST. ABOUT 6 MONTHS LATER, HE RECEIVED A PHONE CALL. 

[TAKE SOT]

{Michael Cizek/UF Student

“I didn’t really know what I was signing up for. I didn’t really think I’d ever get a phone call.”}

[TAKE VO]

AFTER FURTHER BLOOD TESTING HE WAS A MATCH FOR THE MAN THAT NEEDED A BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT. CIZEK THEN TRAVELED TO WASHINGTON, D.C. TO DONATE SOME OF HIS BONE MARROW TO THE MAN HE HAD NEVER MET BEFORE. IT WASN’T UNTIL EARLIER TODAY AT THE X AMBASSADORS CONCERT THAT JEFF-ERY TURN-ER MET SIZE-ICK, THE MAN WHO RECEIVED THE BONE MARROW, FOR THE FIRST TIME. 

[TAKE SOT]

{Jeffery Turner/Bone Marrow Recipient

“You try to think of what you’re going to say to somebody that saved your life. That’s a hard thing to come up with.”}

[TAKE VO]

TURNER SETTLED ON THE ONLY WORDS THAT SEEM APPROPRIATE: “THANK YOU”

[TAKE SOT]

{Michael Cizek/UF Student

“It was an opportunity to save someone’s life, and I feel like I don’t get too many of those opportunities.”}

[TAKE VO]

TURNER NEEDED THE BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT BECAUSE HE WAS DIAGNOSED WITH A TYPE OF BLOOD CANCER CALLED ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA. THE DISEASE IS DEADLY AND PROGRESSES RAPIDLY, THE DIRECTOR OF THE BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT PROGRAM AT U-F HEALTH SHANDS HOSPITAL DOCTOR JOHN WIN-GUARD SAID. 

[TALENT EXIT]

TURN-ER AND SIZE-ICK PLAN TO STAY IN TOUCH. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO GIVE SOMEONE A SECOND CHANCE AT LIFE BY DONATING YOUR BONE MARROW CHECKOUT THE BONE MARROW REGISTRY’S WEBSITE. 

University of Florida campus Earth week almost here

Background Info: For this story, all students had to write a story about the environment, health, sustainability or technology. I decided to go with sustainability since it is something I am passionate about. 

Earth Day is about a month away, which means the University of Florida’s Office of Sustainability is hard at work planning campus Earth week.  

This year’s Earth Week will occur from April 9 to 14.

Earth week will start off with a keynote speaking event at the University Auditorium, according to the Office of Sustainability’s website. The event will feature Paul Hawken, who is an Environmentalist and Executive Director of Project Drawdown

“He is one of the environmental movement’s leading voices,” according to Hawken’s website. “Project Drawdown is a non-profit dedicated to researching when and how global warming can be reversed.”

This year’s Earth week focuses on climate change and what the university can do to get things moving in that realm, said Outreach and Communications Coordinator at the University of Florida Office of Sustainability Allison Vitt. 

“It should be awesome, and we’re hoping to bring together a lot of people across campus,” Vitt said. 

UF student Kayla Mudger, a third-year biology major from Lakeland said, she loves science and enjoys learning new things about the field because it is not her strict area of focus for her major  

She expects to hear some current updates and perspectives of recent events and trends in the global environment, Mudger said. Topics such as global warming and pollution are what she would expect to hear the most about. 

The second event of the week is the Sustainability Showcase which, is scheduled to take place on April 11, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., according to the Office of Sustainability’s website. The event will feature a tabling expo with campus and community organizations, interactive displays, games and more. 

The event is meant to bring all the organizations together to showcase what they are working on and doing, Vitt said. The event allows for people to learn about sustainability efforts on campus and find organizations they might want to get involved in. 

In previous years the exotic animal club has brought out baby alligators and snakes, which people can hold and take pictures with, Vitt said.

This year a screening of the “Story of Stuff,” which is a film series will also be playing at the event, according to the Facebook event page.

After the showcase, another keynote speaker, Philippe Cousteau, is scheduled to speak in Emerson Hall at 5 p.m., according to the event page. Cousteau in an Emmy-nominated TV host, author, speaker, and social entrepreneur who has established himself as a prominent leader in the environmental movement.

Although the Sustainably Showcase seems interesting, this isn’t in his realm of interests, said UF student Nicholas Gunn a third-year finance major from Dunedin.

 “I am also super busy, and I wouldn’t want to involve my time even further,” Gunn said. 

Earth week is set to end on April 14thwith the “Green and Clean Service Learning Event,” according to the Office of Sustainability’s website. 

The Office of Sustainability goes out to one of the conservation areas around campus, Vitt said. For about two hours volunteers comb through the selected area pulling of trash and invasive plants. 

It is a cool program that UF only started running in the last two years, Vitt said. This year the event will take place at the Bartram-Carr Woods.

People interested in volunteering should arrive by 9:30 a.m., according to the event page. Snacks and refreshments will be provided for all volunteers. 

“I would go to this event because I love to be outside and I love UF's campus,” Mudger said. “I would happily spend a few hours cleaning up so that everyone can enjoy the beauty of nature as it was intended to be, and not as we have made it.”

Trash is not biodegradable and only makes the campus look dirty and undesirable, Mudger said. She thinks the event will be beneficial. 

“We are hoping to get a big group out there to cap off our campus Earth week,” Vitt said.

Mudger is definitely a supporter of UF’s Earth week, Mudger said. I would like to look into it more in hopes of attending one or two events. 

“I think that the events sound great and are going to provide greater awareness to people that attend them,” Gunn said.

The Office of Sustainability should consider marketing the event though, Gunn said.  He would have never heard of these events if it wasn’t for this interview.

University of Florida sets out to beat other schools in recycling competition

Background Info: This story was written based on a live lecture were a guest talked about sustainability. In addition to the lecture, I had to find two sources and interview them. 

Each year the University of Florida participates in a challenge called Recyclemania. The challenge started on Jan. 24, 2018 and will end March 31st. 

This year the University of Florida is trying to dive into the competitive aspect of the program and recycle more than any other university.

Recyclemania's goal is to find which university can recycle the most and can reduce the most waste during the period, said Outreach and Communications Coordinator at the University of Florida Office of Sustainability Allison Vitt.

"Every week the schools that are registered to participate provide data," Vitt said. "They report numbers to the official Recyclemania program that keeps track of all of those things."

At the end of the eight weeks winners are announced in different categories, Vitt said. 

UF began participating in the competition in 2007 and received third place for the number of recyclables collected regardless of population, Vitt said. Since then UF hasn't placed in any of the categories. 

This year the university decided to promote their participation, Vitt said. The Office of Sustainability did a challenge video to kick-off the competition and partnered with Gators Going Green.

"GGG is a UF Student Government Agency that aims to promote green initiatives and establish a permanent culture of environmental awareness," said GGG Agency Head Madison Smith. 

GGG was also able to make a video that specifically challenged Florida State University, another participant in the challenge, Vitt said. Most of the competition so far has occurred over social media.

"GGG is helping the Office of Sustainability with promotions of the competition so that students are more likely to participate," Smith said.

UF will be able to come out on top if the school can get as many people to recycle as possible, Vitt Said.

All students at UF can participate by reducing waste, bringing their own water bottle or reusable Tupperware to events such as Krishna, Vitt said.

"UF students can participate in the competition by recycling things that can be recycled, and encouraging others to do so," Smith said. "So much gets thrown away that can be recycled. This is where the students need to make changes in their own lives."

Every week the numbers change so there is no way of knowing for sure where UF stand against the other universities currently, said Recycling and Solid Waste Coordinator Dale Morris. UF does not look at the numbers until the end of the competition since it varies each week.

One thing that may hurt where UF falls is that UF weighs all the recycled material and report real numbers, Morris said. Other universities use estimates, and it is easy to overestimate how much is being recycled. 

"A lot of the time the colleges that win at the top of the per capita category tend to be places you have never heard of," Morris said. "It seems like to me if I haven't heard of them they probably aren't very big, so they are probably overestimating."

When UF switched to weighting, not estimating, all the recycled materials the numbers went down, Morris said. This may be why the school has not placed since the first year we participated.

"Recycling is the right thing to do," Morris said. "We are always looking for ways to continue improvement at UF."

Student interns, finds new major

Background Info: This story was written about a real student in one of the lab section. 

Stephanie Siler was able to find a new major through an internship at the Belmont Child Care Association. 

Siler’s work at the BCCA lead her to realize that public relations would be a more flexible major than business. 

The internship was offered to Siler through her mom’s best friend, who is the Executive Director of the BCCA. The organization never had an intern before Siler, so they were not expecting much.

“I really loved it, so I asked for more responsibilities and hours,” she said. 

Her favorite part of interning at the BCCA was getting to see the kids leave the daycare each day, Siler said. 

“Every day all the little girls would come by and show us what they were wearing or the arts and crafts they had made that day,” she said.

She loved seeing the opportunities that the kids had by being there, Siler said. Before the daycare was created, these kids were being left home alone while their parents were out working. 

While at the BCCA, Siler started out doing business tasks, but as she took on more responsibilities, the tasks became more public relations themed, she said.

Siler was able to plan different events for the organization, work with other organizations and interact with people, she said. She liked these tasks more than working with numbers.

“It became a lot clearer that I really liked Public Relations,” she said. “I really liked interacting with people over the business aspect of the role.”

When Siler realized that she liked the public relations side of the role more, she decided to change her major, Siler said. 

“It gave me a lot more freedom to do different things and explore different things,” she said. 

Through this experience, Siler hopes to give real-life guidance to those doubting their major or career choice, she said. 

“Business and PR are not hugely different, but PR gives me so much more flexibility,” she said. 

Two deer enter local Gainesville shops in search of music and coffee

Background Info: This story was written off of a prompt from a lab instructor.

On Sunday afternoon at about 1:30 p.m., two deer from the Millhopper area were startled and took off towards the Hunter Crossing Shopping Center. 

Once there, one of the deer entered Deb Bordeaux's store, Hoggtowne Music. The other entered Howard Michaelson's store, Starbucks. 

The first deer came crashing through the window, Bordeaux said. Ten customers were in the store at the time. 

"I was worried that it would hurt someone," Bordeaux said.

The deer ran into a customer and then jumped behind the register, Bordeaux said. Everything was chaotic until someone was told to open the front door.

The deer was out the door and gone once it was opened, Bordeaux said. 

The deer caused about $1,000 in damage, and no one was hurt, Bordeaux said. A window needs to be replaced, but the store remains open for business.

The second deer smashed through the front door of Starbucks, Michaelson said. The deer leaped past him as he was arranging items outside.

The deer went to the back of the store and tried jumping over a table where two customers were sitting, Michaelson said. The deer slipped but did not seem hurt. After that, the deer turned around and left.

The store didn't lose any merchandise, and the door will cost $900 to get fixed, Michaelson said. Only six customers were in the store, and no one was hurt.

"The deer have been our neighbors since the shopping center opened,” Michaelson said. “No way anything like this has happened before.”

Deer are usually shy around humans, said Professor in the Department of Wildlife and Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida Brad Woodleigh. 

"Sometimes during mating season they can behave in unusual ways," Woodleigh said. 

In North Central Florida, mating season is typically is October through January but can last into February, Woodleigh said. The incident is surprising because it is late in the year for the deer to be acting like that.

Deer do not usually hurt people directly, but sometimes their lives conflict with ours, Woodleigh said.

"It's possible they were after one last fling," Woodleigh said.